The hidden signs of cancer in your toilet habits – could you be at risk?

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Cancer is a deadly disease that’s one of the most common causes of death in the UK and around the world. You may be at risk of a tumour if you notice some small changes to your usual toilet habit.

Cancer is a serious disease where cells in the body grow and reproduce uncontrollably.

The new, cancerous cells can destroy surrounding tissue, and can spread to attack health organs.

Cancer symptoms usually include any unexplained changes to the body. That may involve finding blood in your urine or stools, or the sudden appearance of a lump.

But you could also be at risk of the disease if you develop any slight change to your bowel habit, with no obvious reason.

Changes to toilet habits is one of the most common symptoms of cancer, according to the Mayo Clinic.

While it’s unlikely to be caused by something serious, it may be an early sign of bowel cancer.

A change to your bowel habit includes a number of different symptoms, including passing looser stools than normal, or even going more frequently.

Some people may also find that the colour of their stools change over time.

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“Cancer is the second-leading cause of death in the world,” said the Mayo Clinic.

“But survival rates are improving for many types of cancer, thanks to improvements in cancer screening and cancer treatment.

“Signs and symptoms caused by cancer will vary depending on what part of the body is affected.

“Some general signs and symptoms associated with, but not specific to, cancer, include fatigue, weight changes, skin changes, [and] changes in bowel or bladder habits.”

But just because you notice a change to your toilet routine, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you have bowel cancer.

It could also be caused by celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, or even a thyroid disorder.

You should speak to a doctor if your bowel changes last longer than two weeks.

But you should seek medical attention straight away if you develop severe abdominal pain, or find blood in your stools.

You could lower your risk of bowel cancer by making some small diet or lifestyle changes.

Eating large amounts of red and processed meats have been linked with a higher likelihood of bowel cancer.

Smoking, drinking too much alcohol and obesity could also lead to the disease, the NHS warned.

More than 90 percent of all bowel cancer causes occur in people over the age of 50.

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